These guys are the real Alpine runners

Alpine running in Chamonix

Alpine running is a name given to moving fast in a mountain environment. It’s a blend of climbing, running and skiing: whichever is applicable to the terrain. It’s normally done “fast and light”, taking minimal equipment, to aid the speediness.

Given that I like climbing, skiing and running but will never be able to invest the time to become a really skilled Alpinist on technical accents, I think I’ve found a niche! I’m going to tell my friends that I’ve become an alpine runner. They will tell me that I’m doing “not-trail, not-running”, and that I’m going “not particularly fast and not particularly light “. I’ll say I’m still learning.

Running Skiing
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Diabetes diagnosis and how participating in clinical research can help

Guys hospital research unit hosted a group of MPs and Diabetes UK staff for a tour of their facilities today. Guys has a world class research facility and does more for diabetes research than I could do justice to here. The number of dedicated staff supported by sophisticated (and expensive) machines gave me renewed hope that we can beat type 1.

I was asked to speak about my experience of being diagnosed and of participating in a clinical trial. I’ve written about my diagnosis quite a bit in the early days of this blog,  but with the benefit of hindsight,  I thought I could summarise my experience with a few pictures.

Diagnosis
Pill

A snapshot of diabetes care in the UK

I watched the History of Everything last night. It was a brilliant film, and another reminder that there are plenty of things in life worse than having type 1 diabetes.

I watched the Theory of Everything last night. It was a brilliant film, and another reminder that there are plenty of things in life worse than having type 1 diabetes.

I had my annual eye scan last week. After missing my first appointment due to diarising it for the wrong day (cue pangs of guilt), I turned up at Homerton hospital on a damp Thursday morning to have my eyes photographed.

Retinopathy is a common problem for diabetics. High levels of sugar in the blood vessels damage the eyes over time, eventually leading to blindness. A 2002 study showed that almost all American adults with type 1 diabetes for 20 years and 60% of adults with type 2, had retinopathy. It is the leading cause of blindness in the under 65s. What horrific statistics!

Diabetes Management